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Archeology

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Last Updated On: 11/02/2015  


The district has a number of Archeological objects of interest, in which the temples form the main chunk. Of the ancient temples of Mandi town, it may be said in general that the architecture is good. they are chiefly in stone and in style with the Shikhara temples of the plains. They consist of a cella, surmounted by a saphire and a porch usually decorated with carvings. The saphire is of the usual type. In sancturies of a later time, however, it assumes the shape of a dome, in consequence of which they appear more like mosques than Hindu temples. The larger and more important temples are also furnished with an anteroom or mandap.    


TRILOKINATH TEMPLE:


It is a Shiva temple erected in stone in the Shikhara style. The cella contains a lefe-sized three faced stone image of Shiva who is riding on a bull with Parvati in his lap. There is also a second image, probably of Shiva, which is much worn out. The workman throughout is good but the carving has  suffered much from neglect and is much worn owing to the soft nature of the sandstone employed but is still one of the finest monuments. The image which it enshrines is connected with the rite of Sati, in which a woman whose husnabd would die would burn herself on the funral pire. Such a woman was brought to the temple before she mounted the pire and was shown the face at the back of the idol.

 

THE PANCHVAKTRA TEMPLE:


At the confluence of the Beas and Suketi is a Shikara temple evidently of considerable age and dedicated to Shiva, under the name of Panchvaktra (the five-faced one). the main porch or mandap is supported on four heavy pillars, the capitals of which are carved in flower-pot design and the bases in rosettes of lAt the confluence of the Beas and Suketi is a Shikhara temple evidently of considerable age and dedicated  to Shiva, under the name of Panchvaktra (the five-faced one). the main porch or mandap is supported on four heavy pillars, the capitals of which are carved in flower-pot design and the bases in rosettes of lotuses. The main image is of some interest, since the five faces are not placed in one row as is usually the case with polycephalic statues, but in such a way that the fourth face is on the reverse side of the slab which is otherwise quite plain and fifth on top of the image slab. thus when seen from the front, only three faces are visible. The number of arms is ten. Such images of the five-faced Shiva are not uncommon in Mandi.

 

THE SALANU ROCK INSCRIPTION:


The oldest archaelogical record is the inscription on a rock at Salanu about 1 1/2 miles from Manglaur which is ascribed to the fourth or fifth century. It simply records that a Maharaja Sri-Chandesvara-hastin, who was the son of a Maharaja Ishvara-hastin, and belonging to the family of Vatsa, conquered in battle a Rajjila-bala and founded a town of which the apperently was Salipuri, presently the present village of Salri situated near the site of the inscription. These names are of no historical importance as their relationship is unknown.



 

THE BHOOTNATH TEMPLE: 


The most popular shrine in Mandi is that of Bhuth Nath who is venerated as the guardian of the town and represents Shiva in his attributes. The temple is of stone in the Shikara style, consisting of a small porch

 and cella surmounted by a spire. The sabha mandap in front is apperently and addition. The porch is supported by fluted pillars with capitals carved in elephants, the arch between being trefoil.


    


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